Tag: sewing pattern

printing fabric with bleach for stitched mushrooms

The quest for the perfect organic dot fabric for toadstools is never ending, I’m always on the look out for fungal feeling dots, speckles and marks in general and I’m super particular. Shopping in LA a few weeks ago there was lots of nice batik stuff that was close but no cigar. I described my dream fabric to my friend Molly and she said “dude you could totally make that”. That is such a good attitude. Yesterday I experimented a little. And dude, I can totally make that, so can you.

making marks on cotton fabric with bleach

Gather some cotton fabric, bleach, wax paper and tools for mark making. I tried all sorts of things, rubber stamps, pallet knives, brushes, straws, cardboard, spools, on and on. Also put on an apron and some gloves and do this somewhere very well ventilated or outside.

marking with bleach on fabric using a pencil eraser

I had one little dish of straight up bleach (you just need a little) and another diluted about 2 parts bleach to one part water. I put wax paper under the fabric and started making marks. My favorite tools ended up being a pencil eraser, putty knife, a stiff bristle brush, a toothbrush for splattering and a little spool that I glued a piece of wool felt to one end of. A cork would have been good too – just thought of it.

spool with wool felt glued to one end for bleach printing

cotton fabrics printed with bleach for making fabric toadstools

The marks take a moment to begin to “develop”. I let most of the fabric sit for about 20 minutes before rinsing. I have googled/pinterested around and there are all sorts of interesting things you can do with this technique and you can get pretty fancy about it. Find a great tutorial here and another here. 

toadstools made from fabric

toadstools made from fabric, brown and red with spots

little mushroom sewing pattern

 

find the mushroom sewing pattern here

I love how they turned out, the bleach prints are so perfect for little fungi and there are endless things you could experiment with to make marks.

 

 

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it’s time to make the squirrels, stitching expressive creature eyes and wool stuffing in the shop

little hand stitched squirrel

little stuffed squirrels and whale ornaments on my work table

It is time to make all the little things, the little gift and ornament things. It is officially time. For those of you less procrastinatey than me it is way past time, I know you are out there, you organized types who start in June. Maybe I’ll turn over a new leaf this year, I would love to be done making my Christmas stuff by Thanksgiving.

little hand stitched squirrel

little stuffed wool squirrel

forest folk sewing pattern

 

Today I’m making very little squirrels, and thoughtful whales. This squirrel is just the right size for somebody’s pocket. He looks very happy in there.

get the forest folk pattern

stuffed wool squirrel in my pocket

He is a relentlessly happy little fellow.

whale ornament eye

For most of my small creatures I make the eyes the same way, a disorganized little cluster of stitches (you can see how I hide my knots here). On wool I use embroidery thread so it shows but on cotton I like the subtlety of sewing thread. And I find the less I think about the placement of the stitches the better, the more expressive the eyes turn out. This little whale has things on his mind.

squirrels and whales on my work table

adjusting stuffing placeement with a large needle

I stuff all the little folks and creatures with the loveliest wool stuffing. I spend a lot of time stuffing things, getting it just right and almost always fine tune the shape from the outside with a big needle.

Have you tried wool stuffing? it is all I use and I’ve added it to the shop in 4 ounce packs – that’s enough wool for lots of little creatures.

Are you sewing for the holidays? What’s on your worktable?

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the songbird pattern booklet

bird pattern booklet and wool stuffing

bird sewing pattern bookletsongbird booklets are back in stock now

I need deadlines. For everything. Even stuff I love doing.

I knew that before but I thought of it as a shortcoming. A bad thing about me I need to change instead of acknowledging how I’m wired and working with that reality. Figure out what I need, identify what motivates me and arrange my life as optimally as possible to support that. Just like time, focus, energy and attention motivation needs to be managed.

There is nothing like a credible threat to get you moving.  The songbird booklet lingered in almost done for ages. The unmovable, fixed date of the Squam Art Fair was the perfect motivation to push the print pattern across the finish line. Get up a little earlier, work a little later, beg the printer (local and awesome). Make it happen. It was painful. And I’m so glad I did it.

bird pattern booklet and wool stuffing

I love the booklet, and I love that it is done. It is more than 20 pages and illustrated with over 100 black and white photos. Checkout some lovely birds made from the pattern below and if you like you can send images to me at info at ann wood handmade dot com or use #annwodpattern on instagram.

P S- By the way I’m thinking of offering wool stuffing in the shop this fall – what do you think?

amulets and toadstools on my work table

fabric amulets and mushrooms on my work table

fabric amulets and mushrooms on my work table

Labor Day Weekend, the unofficial start of the holiday season. Just kidding.  Mostly. It does have a shifting feel to it though, everything starting back up again.  It’s going to be a sewing weekend for me. Fun sewing, amulets and mushrooms and Monday devoted entirely to experimenting. I’ll give you the full report on that next week.

fabric amulets and mushrooms on my work table

I’m still having  a good time making amulets, small thoughts, and they are generating all sorts of color and composition ideas for larger or more involved things.  They have become morning work for me, hand sewing with coffee before I’m quite awake yet. I love having a little stack ready to go and waiting for me.

fabric amulets on my work table

Do you pick up handwork first thing? What are you making? Can you give yourself a day or an hour or 20 minutes to play and experiment this weekend?

These are the things I want to know.

the songbird pattern is in the shop and a free tutorial : how to make a realistic bird foot

sewing pattern for a textile songbird

The songbird PDF pattern is in the shop.

Get the PDF digital pattern here and the booklet version here.

It has more than 100 color photos and detailed instructions.  You need basic sewing skills and some patience if you are a beginner.

stitched songbird in a tree

textile songbird in prospect park

hand stitched songbird - back

And to celebrate the instructions for making a realistic bird leg are below. I hope you make songbirds!

How to make a realistic bird leg with wire:

You can use any gauge wire you like, I think that 19 gauge soft annealed wire is the easiest to work with and provides enough stability for the legs. You can build up the thickness of the legs and feet by adding additional layers of floral tape.

how to make a realistic bird leg - step 1

1. Gather the wire, floral tape, hammer, pliers and cutters, ruler and a surface to hammer on, I’m using a little anvil but any very hard surface will do.
Cut 2 –  12 inch lengths of wire.

how to make a bird leg - step 2     how to make a realistic bird leg - step 3    2. Hold the wire with the pliers 1 and 1/2 inches from one end.
3. Bend the wire forming a loop.

how to make a realistic bird leg - step 4     how to make a realistic bird leg - step 5
4. Hold the loop just past where the wire crosses with the pliers. Bend the long end of the wire so it is perpendicular to the loop.
5. Wrap the long end of the wire around the short end behind the loop. Wrap as tightly as you can, keeping you fingers very close to the wrapping.

how to make a realistic bird leg - step 6     how to make a realistic bird leg - step 6
6. Place the wire on a hard surface and tap firmly with the hammer to flatten the wire wrapping. This will help the wrap hold in the next step.
7. Use wire cutters to snip the loop in the middle.

Read More

the mushroom print pattern and kit are in the shop

mushroom print sewing pattern

Enchanted mushrooms made from little bits of fabric and other supplies you probably already have.  I’ve just added the new mushroom print pattern and kit!  to the shop.  And in celebration of the 12th  anniversary of ann wood handmade all patterns and kits are 25% off through Monday.

shop the sale

mushroom sewing pattern

mushroom sewing kit supplies

mini handmade toadstool with a red cap

two handmade toadstool with red caps

mushroom sewing kit

If you make mushrooms I’d love to see! You can use #annwoodhandmade on instagram or email me a photo at info at ann wood handmade dot com.

little doll jacket : a free sewing tutorial

tiny rag doll jacket

Sometimes a light jacket is just the thing and I’ve made you a simple and easy sewing pattern in two sizes, one for the tiny rag doll (or any dollhouse size doll) and a slightly larger version for mr. socks. And the pattern scales well so you could use it for other dolls too. It’s quick and very easy.

little doll jacket sewing pattern

tiny rag doll jacket

The hat pattern is free too and you can find the satchel pattern here, if you need to fully outfit someone tiny.

mr. socks jacket : free pattern

You might also notice that mr. socks is wearing pants for the first time. I made them using the bloomer pattern for the tiny rag doll sewing pattern. I add about 1/4 inch to the pattern and left an opening in the back to accommodate his tail.

mr. socks

mr. socks in pants
little doll jacket : free tutorial

little doll jacket : free tutorial

To make the jacket you will need : wool felt, an embroidery thread, a tiny button, basic sewing supplies and the pattern.

download the sewing pattern here

* You can click each image for a larger view

1. Cut out the three pattern pieces and pin to your felt.
2. Cut out one of each.

3. Fold the rounded collar of the front top over and stitch.  I’m using one strand of embroidery floss. You can use any stitch you like, fancy or simple. I’m using a basic whip stitch.
4. Fold over each rounded cuff and stitch as well.

5. Pin the front under piece to the back piece, make sure your folded and stitched cuffs  are on the outside.
6. Pin the front top piece as shown.

Read More

good and simple lamb folk

mr. and mrs. lamb

mr. and mrs. lamb

mr. socks : sewing pattern

 

Patched and mended, a little worse for wear, but good and happy sheep, sheep who persevere. I made mr. and mrs. lamb from the mr. socks pattern with just a couple little modifications. Their outfits and the satchel are made from the tiny rag doll clothing and wardrobe patterns with modifications detailed here.

 

The only changes are to the head. I made ears  – gray on one side and black on the other – stitched with the right sides together. I left the last half inch open for turning right side out.

You can grab a template for those little pieces here.

 

I closed the opening, whip stitched around the seam and then stitched the ears to the head. I cut a little circular head cover instead of the pointy mr. socks head cover.

I pinned the head cover in place and stitched over the ears and across the front. I added a tiny bit of stuffing before closing the back so his head would be smooth.

lamb ragdolls

Here they are all sheepified – mrs. has got some seriously happy ears.

tiny doll wardrobe

tiny trousers

free doll pants sewing pattern

 

Mr. L’s tiny trousers are my favorite part – made from the super easy and free! tiny pants sewing pattern.

The little pants are quick and easy to make and easy to size up or down for other dolls. Find the pattern and tutorial here.

 

mr.lamb

Mr. L sports the always risky pants and scarf but no shirt look.

mr. lamb in the forest

He is off to wander among the woebegone pines.  Find the free pattern for the trees right here. And perhaps some sledding, still sans shirt…

lamb doll on a popsicle stick sled in the snow

(find the popsicle stick sled diy here)

 

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mr. socks : the print edition

 mr. socks : a sewing pattern

Mr. socks is in print!  My second print pattern is in the shop. It’s a 12 page booklet with 47 hand drawn illustrations.  I’m starting another print pattern this evening while the mechanics of putting it all together are all still fresh in my mind.  And while my drawing muscle feels strong.  I love the little booklets – they are a giant amount of work but I love making them.

 mr. socks : a sewing pattern

mr. socks takes a stroll

Maybe you’ll make a mischievous cat. Maybe he will have an adventure. I’m rolling around the idea of a photo contest for later this summer  – more on that soon.

the rutabaga pattern is here and meditative stitch for percolating ideas

rutabaga sewing pattern

It’s a relatively quick project – depending on how long you linger in the details. I’ve taught it at a workshop and fabulous turnips and rutabagas were created in under 4 hours.

stitched rutabaga applique

Personally – I like to linger in the details of these – especially the appliqué. It’s repetitive, easy, relaxing work that requires just enough attention to make it the perfect activity for percolating ideas.  Or netflix.

I make it my job to have ideas – lot’s of ideas –  and I love the sensation of letting an idea percolate, letting my subconscious have a crack at it.  I drift into pleasant, soft focus daydreamy work and behind the scenes problems get solved, perspective shifts and connections are made. A brisk walk works too but then I don’t get a lovely rutabaga out of the deal.

I also like the appliqué portion of the program because it goes against my grain a little  (a lot). I’m sometimes afraid of raw edges in a way that inhibits me creatively – I can get too obsessed with being neat and buttoning things up and lose the essence of the thing.    I’ve been experimenting with pretty traditional  appliqué (I’ll show you soon) and would like to get a little free-er in my designs.

stitched rutabaga

Besides the meditative benefits there are so many reasons to make a rutabaga (or turnip) – they are, I think, the most beautiful of the root vegetables.  No one is ever expecting a stitched turnip so they make wonderful gifts.  And these rutabagas have a secret ingredient that makes them balance in a dynamic, root vegetable-lish way.

stitched rutabaga sewing pattern

I add a little weighted fill – 1mm glass bead fill is my favorite. You can also use sand or crushed walnut shells.  I put 2-4 spoonfuls in the toe of an old pair of tights to keep it in one spot and insert it into the bottom. The result is a rutabaga that perches at a jaunty angle instead of just lying on its side.

turni[p sewing pattern

I hope you make rutabagas (or turnips)!  And if you do I’d love to see – you can email photos to me at info at ann wood handmade dot com or share on instagram using #annwoodpattern.

rutabaga sewing pattern

outfitting mrs. spots (and mr. socks)

rag doll : mrs. spots

rag doll : mrs. spots

Meet Mrs. Spots – a dear old friend of Mr. Socks. There have been a number of questions lately – and – I have wondered myself – if the tiny rag doll’s wardrobe could work for the Mr. Socks doll pattern.  I spent some time experimenting with that and – with some adjustments – it can – more on that in a minute.

cat rag doll sewing pattern

mr. socks

free patterns:

There are also a couple free patterns that come  in Mrs. Spot’s (or Mr. Socks) size – the hat pictured above –  get it here. And  a free felt jacket pattern.

Plus there is a free pants pattern here – gather the hem to use it for bloomers for Mrs. Spots.

 

rag doll : mrs. spots

adjusting the tiny rag doll pattern for mr. socks

Beginning with the dress (the dress is from the tiny rag doll pattern) – it needs to be a little larger,  Mrs. Spots is taller than the tiny rag doll and has considerable girth around the middle. There are two easy ways to do it – you can add a quarter inch to the dress pattern   – the cut line becomes the stitch line with the exception of the back center seam – don’t add extra there.

Or just enlarge the pattern to 115%  ( I have not tried this with the pinafore apron yet but I suspect enlarging it to 115% would work – if you give it a try I’d love to see).

rag doll : mrs. spots

rag doll : mrs. spots

For the coat – so easy – you can use the pattern at it’s original size but skip the hood and do not sew the back seam (step 3 in the pattern)  – leave the full width.  The little satchel works as is too. (The coat and satchel are both from the coat, bag and hat pattern).

mr. socks : sewing pattern   tiny doll : winter wardrobe

rag doll : mrs. spots

 You can make Mrs. Spots or Mr. Socks a bed and quilt too! Find the free patterns here.

free paper mache ship pattern

And they love to go boating – there is a free ship pattern there’s just right for Socks or Spots right here.

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a coat for tiny rag doll and a free tiny hat tutorial

tiny traveler

winter rag doll

Of course she needs a sensible coat!  And it’s reversible! I’m pretty excited about the reversibleness of the coat – and the nifty way it goes together – it feels like kind of a magic trick ( I included a video link for that part). I also love that the coat is built from just two pieces and demonstrates an awesome system for making reversible doll garments – you could modify the pattern and use the same easy technique to create all sorts of lined or reversible little clothes.

I also made a little lined flat bottomed satchel for her foraging and a hat  too. Tiny rag doll is ready for adventure.

Find sample pages from the pattern here and here.

tiny doll : winter wardrobe

shop_button_coat

tiny rag doll winter wardrobe

The winter wardrobe pattern is in the shop now

free tiny hat pattern

And I’m including the little hat pattern in this post too – download the template here and instructions are below – it’s very simple, easy and quick – you can make one in under twenty minutes.

For the tiny hat you will need a little wool, felt or flannel and contrasting embroidery thread. Pin the hat pattern to the fabric and cut out.

Whip stitch all around the bottom edge with a strand or two of embroidery thread.

ann wood tiny doll hat 3

Fold the hat in half and whip stitch the back seam from the bottom towards the tip.

tiny doll hat

Knot just before the tip and fray the tip. And finally tie little lengths of embroidery thread to the ear flaps and knot.

tiny_doll_hat

tiny traveler

She is fully outfitted for her travels. A couple other notes on the pattern- the coat and satchel will fit mr. socks too and you could scale it for other dolls. I have not tried the hat on mr. socks – but I think it would work if you enlarge it a little.

Find more tiny rag doll accessory DIY projects here!

 

tiny doll : winter wardrobe
ann wood handmade : tiny hat

the somewhat weekly newsletter

Do you get my free weekly-ish newsletter? There are tips and tricks, ideas, stuff to try, all the latest news and blogposts and extra stuff, just for subscribers, delivered mostly on Friday. Pretty much.