Tag: soft sculpture

improvisational doll making – part 1

improvisational doll making

Its good to experiment – but not easy to let yourself,  there is a powerful force that wants you to stay on the well lit path.  Experimenting generates ideas and makes you ask new questions. It can shift your perspective, reveal connections and intersections.  And maybe most importantly true experimentation helps you work with uncertainty and build a tolerance for trying stuff that might not work. There is no creativity without failure.

One way to make yourself experiment is to create conditions that force you to improvise. I’m going to show you one of the techniques I use.  I’m making dolls – from the inside out. It’s a method that is imprecise and difficult to control – in a good way – there is lots of opportunity for happy accidents. It’s a spontaneous process – each action builds on the previous – you work with what shows up.

If you would like to try you will need:

* you can click on any of the images for a larger view

wire doll forms

I start by making a simple wire form for the torso and head – I made three.  Next  cut strips of cotton batting and begin to build a shape by winding it around the wire form.  A little bit of glue stick will help when adding or ending a strip.

Keep winding until you are happy with the shape – you can also add bits of batting in some areas for rounder shapes – like in the center image above – I’ve given her a substantial bosom by adding a scrap of folded batting and winding over it. I stitch through the shape here and there to adjust it and help it all stay together and finally I cut pieces of batting to stitch over the shape.

Next I begin to add fabric – I’m using a very light cotton to cover her face and the front of her chest. I pull the fabric around – stitch it in place and trim away the extra.

I covered the edge of the face fabric with strips of cotton for hair – I’ll come back to that later – I want to make the top of her dress first.  Also – you may notice another doll has appeared – I’ll be working on her as well.

Her face and chest  are covered in a light ivory silk, I used black cotton for her hair and stitched super simple features. Now I’m adding a scrap of lace because it’s lovely and will also cover some edges and seams I’d like to conceal.  Read More

bats and perseverance

bat work

bat work

I have been bothered by bats for a very long time.  They were one of my first stitched creatures. I love them but vowed to never make another.  The process was brutal on my hands and had a high late stage failure rate.  And they took an outrageous amount of time.  But I love them, I love their shape, their curves and the way that shape seems to change as they twirl in the breeze and the lovely shadows they cast.

stitched bat

So lately I started from scratch – a whole new method of constructing them.  There have been several dismal failures but in the past week I’ve landed on something good -. It’s much easier hand-wise and the result is reliable and consistent.  It still takes forever. Not as bad as the original bats but still problematic.  I’m not sure I can get to a place where I can produce them with any efficiency but I’m not done trying.

stitched bat

edwardian bat

botanical experiments and 11 years of blogging

stitched seedpod experiment

white rotary

A blog anniversary snuck past in February – 11 years.  When I did remember I thought maybe I didn’t really have anything to say about it.  But the comments about the machine on last week’s post changed my mind.  I remembered what a part of everything the machine has been.  I remembered the serendipity,  the sweetness and steadiness of it’s presence in my life and work.

It has been with me for all of it.  My mother’s machine.  I have sewn on it my entire life.  So I want to mark this anniversary with an entirely true and slightly spooky story about it.  It happened in the very beginning of this blog – 11 years ago:

In December of 2006 I had just begun my solo enterprise – I had lots of orders and deadlines and on the eve of one of those very important deadlines I was still sewing furiously very late at night. With a long way still to go the machine suddenly stopped and a chunk of metal rocketed past my face. I found it across the room – an essential part of the machine – no sewing without it – and it was broken. I tried to fix it but nothing worked. I have a drawer full of bits and pieces that I saved from my Father’s workshop – bits of metal and rubber, knobs, washers, gears, springs etc. I thought maybe I could cobble some temporary solution together from those. Another hour of frustration and no luck at all. Exhausted, defeated and ready to give up I pushed the drawer closed and it stuck halfway, I pushed again and it stuck again, I pulled and it stuck. I gave a great big angry pull and the drawer flew out and what had caused it to stick also flew out and landed  – right   in    my    lap.  To my amazement and disbelief it was a replacement for the broken sewing machine part – the exact part – identical but for the color. Not similar, not “good enough” the EXACT PART in perfect condition. I snapped it in and it worked beautifully, that night and all the nights and days that have followed.

The End.

botanical experiment

And – a little bit of what I’m working on today. New botanical experiments.  I think the one above will be a pink cloaked bishop lily and below a seedpod experiment – playing with the idea of honeycomb texture. I’ve got plans for more and I’ll show you next week.  I’m also planning on a shop update next week  (postponed for a bit) with botanicals and some creatures. You can sign up here to be notified by email when new items are available.

stitched seedpod experiment

please meet vivienne and work on a new rag doll experiment

Entirely nude, but for a threadbare whisper of a nightgown.

vivienne : naked ragdoll

The gown is made from the sleeve of an Edwardian lawn gown – so simple to make. I just hemmed the top edge – gathered across the front side and added ribbon ties that go around her neck – halter style.

vivienne : an immodest doll

She is offered in the shop – along with a few other new things – as promised I’ve been adding at least one new thing every day and will continue to for as long as seems reasonable.  For now she is happy here,  she sits serenely,  in her nightgown,  silently judging that little ant who admires himself so constantly.

ant and ragdoll

ant and ragdoll

And something new on my worktable – an evolving rag doll creature. The texture thing is pretty ambitious and I’m not sure I’ll ever do it again,  it’s labor intensive even by my standards.  But I do like the effect on him.

ragdoll experiment

color stories : yellow and pink

18th century textile birds

18th century textile birds

My favorite textiles have been the ones that find me. They bring colors I could not imagine.  These 18th century pieces (a beautiful gift) are mesmerizing and expanded my understanding of what yellow and pink can be.

vermeer songbird

vermeer_yellow_textiles

This is yellow that sounds like trumpets, bright, triumphant trumpets and pink and crimson that sound like weeping violins.

“if a violin string could ache, i would be that string.” ― Vladimir NabokovLolita

pink antique textiles

18th century textile

crimson_and_pink_songbird_1

crimson and-pink songbird

I’m making songbirds and trying hard to do the colors and textures justice- they have waited such a long time.

turnips, mosquitos and the big bad wolf

stitched turnip

* shop announcement the new things below and some suprises are in the shop now –  Friday 11/4

stitched turnip

A heroic root vegetable – the majestic turnip. I love making these – rutabagas and turnips – the stitching is meandering and meditative and I like experimenting with textures and layering.  I have found that antique table linens are ideal for making the shape – the cotton is thick and there is a little sheen. I layer sheer cottons – often pieces of antique kimonos and lots of stitching  to add color and more texture including the  rough edge where the leaves were chopped off. That’s my favorite part.

stitched turnip and rutabaga still life

PS – I’m teaching a class on this very subject in the spring in NYC – at the Sweet Paul Makerie.

And do you remember the wolf? He is among a little group of things started over the summer that finally got finished and photographed this week.

bb wolf

He doesn’t look so bad…. He looks sort of pleasant.

big bad wolf doll

But do not trust him – there is a dark side.

tiny rag doll problems

And he is only one of the problems a tiny rag doll can run into around here.  I finished 5 new mosquitos too – 2 are going on special missions but the other three Edwardian girls will be in the shop tomorrow. Please meet the ladies:

edwardian mosquito

edwardian mosquito

edwardian mosquito

October is for sewing

fortuny songbird

fortuny

“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.”
― L.M. Montgomery,  Anne of Green Gables

Maybe it’s my favorite  –  or maybe tied with March – I like the blustery months. It is just so extraordinarily pleasant – perfect days.  And I’m sewing a ton – hours and hours of hand sewing every day after a longer than usual phase of other things – planning workshops for next year, teaching, making sewing patterns etc. – there was a lot to swim through so I could sit and sew again. I’m making lots of songbirds- some Fortuny – like the birds below and some from antique garments.  I’m also making owls,  and rats, building ships and working on a new shape – a new creature.

fortuny songbird

thread

departing owls and songbirds

hand stitched songbirds

Most of the finished things above are headed off on a special mission in the UK but I do plan to have lots of things in my shop soon and will be sending creatures to the  Fortuny showroom in Manhattan next week.

And check back for progress on the new shape I’m working on – it is another of the often less loved creatures and one I have a complicated relationship with…….

mosquitos on my work table and a pattern sneak peek : turning tiny doll parts

mosquito work : proboscis

The tiny rag doll sewing pattern is pretty much ready to go but I’m waiting until next week to release it – just to make extra sure it is all I want it to be.  I’ve looked at it so long and so hard I can’t see it any more – you know? I’ll review it with fresh eyes in a day or two. The big challenge of the pattern was the littleness and looking for the easiest and most effective ways to deal with tiny sewing – like turning the little arms and legs right side out after sewing.  I included the simple method  below in the pattern.  Maybe everybody already knows this trick but I didn’t until a couple years ago and it works fabulously well – so just in case you haven’t tried it:

turning tiny doll parts

Besides pattern and workshop making work I have some mosquitos on my worktable. Mosquitos are slow, detailed work that involves lots of pins and stabbing myself repeatedly with various instruments – the five  below have been in progress forever and are finally in the homestretch.

mosquito work

mosquito work

mosquito work : proboscis

They suffer such indignities – this poor girl is having her proboscis hammered.  I hammer the wire parts on a tiny anvil to stiffen them after shaping and make them a little textured and sparkly. Three of these Edwardian pests will end up in the shop sometime in the near future and the other two are going on special missions. If you’d like to be notified when I have new pieces available you can sign up here.

a caption contest – win your very own fortuny seed pod

fortuny rat

Update 8/4 : Thanks so much for all the great captions for last weeks contest! The winner is:

“Left, right, cha, cha, cha! One, two, cha, cha, cha!”

I love the idea of  him practicing his dance steps with the mirror – nice work Lourdes!

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

I’m working on mostly top secret things right now – holiday stuff,  2 brand new workshops for next year and the tedious parts – formatting, editing etc. – of creating the rag doll and seed pod patterns.  Since I can’t show you what’s on my work table it’s the perfect time for a caption contest.

I try to make creatures whose expression and body language imply a history – a definite point of view,  a world of their own.  And I like to photograph them in a way that invites you to wonder what’s going on outside the frame.  This is one of my most favorite photos – taken last year in the Adirondacks.  What do you think this dapper rat is up to? What’s on his rat mind?

Make up a caption and leave it in the comments to this post – an esteemed panel of judges will choose a winner to be announced next Thursday.  Everybody is welcome to enter – please leave your caption comment before Wednesday 8/3.

And the prize – a Fortuny seed pod! Such a tragic flower – gone to seed – collapsed in a pretty heap.

fortuny seed pod

fortuny seed pod

a cloaked bishop lilly and other stitched botanicals

stitched botanicals

stitched botanicals

I’ve been experimenting with new botanical shapes.  The flower below is the rare cloaked Bishop Lilly – it only blooms at night.  If the moon is full.  Once every ten years. And only for an hour…..

There are also seedpods,  toadstools and another rare specimen the Royal Cone Flower – valued for the rich crimson bloom as well as it’s medicinal properties – it’s petals make a potent sleeping potion – it is found only in the Black Forest and is nearly extinct.

I love the mystery and strangeness of flowers and I’m exploring them further – playing with the idea of translucency and things gone to seed.  I especially love the foresty parts of the botanical gardens here in Brooklyn and I’ve been finding inspiration in antique botanical prints too – for my invented species as well as the photographs of them – I’m thinking of a postcard set of strange new specimens – what do you think? Also – In addition to the tiny rag doll pattern I’m working on a botanical pattern  for a seed pod with a root system – that will probably be next out. Have a lovely weekend,

ann

cloaked bishop lilly

cloaked bishop lilly

toadstool #10

You can find the sewing pattern for the little toadstool above right here – I printed the pattern at 50% for this little guy.

aubergine_toadstool

royal cone flower

cloaked bishop lilly

plum seedpod

lavender_seedpod_2

miss lilac

And among all the strange flowers – tiny rag doll #4 – miss lilac.

botanical experiments

royal cone flower

This big pink flower woke me up last night. It’s one of the new botanical experiments I’ve been working on and it was finished but I didn’t love it- something wasn’t right. The original stem and roots felt too delicate, too fussy for the flower and out of balance – that idea would not leave me alone. My subconscious must have been working on it for me and  last night I woke up abruptly knowing exactly what it needed – a bulb, a more substantial stem and very simple leaves.   I love the bulb!  More botanical experiments soon – there are all sorts of strange new species on my work table.

Have a lovely weekend,

ann

stitched botanical


stitched botanical

stitched seedpod

stitched seedpod

edwardian mosquitos

grey edwardian mosquito

pale grey edwardian mosquitoMosquitos!  Delicate mosquitos, hand stitched from Edwardian garments. I wonder what she would think, the 19th century girl who floated across  lawns in the gown their wings are made from.  They are mischievous ladies who will bite! But they will be so gentle you won’t feel a thing.  There is a special place in my heart for the less sympathetic creatures – the rats and bats and spiders and who is less loved than mosquitos?

“It is your hateful little trump
You pointed fiend,
Which shakes my sudden blood to hatred of you:
It is your small, high, hateful bugle in my ear.”

The Mosquito
BY D. H. LAWRENCE

I made 6 – I had a truly marvelous time – completely lost in them for days.  They  are all in the shop  (there are some songbirds too).

ann wood : mosquitos

ann wood : mosquitos

russet edwardian mosquito

green edwardian mosquito

songbird work

sri songbird work

I  can never remember where I parked my car or what I had for lunch but I have an excellent fabric memory – sort of.  I have clear and very distinct memories of  the fabrics of my childhood – my whole life really.  I think I could draw them all – maybe I’ll try.  And now, even if a tiny scrap has bee tucked away for years, it’s cataloged in my head, just not very specifically…….  I was absolutely positive that the fabulous little blue scrap in the photo below was here somewhere.  Positive.  And positive that that blue songbird had to have it.  Had to.  And it was – that one little piece – in the only place it could be – at the very bottom of the very last box I looked in.

I’ve been working on this group of Sri Threads songbirds for weeks and they are just about ready.  I was hoping for this week but I’m still climbing out of a crappy spring cold and everything is in slow motion. Some of these and a few other things will be in the shop next week sometime  (sign up here to be notified by email if you like).

sri songbird work

hand stitched songbird

slate sri songbird

sri songbird work

 

cloth, a podcast interview and spheres – a free template to experiment with

indgo sri toadstool

I love cloth.
I always have – as a child it was something I had in abundance and I learned to think well in stitches. I especially love old cloth. Lovely old cloth. I love it for it’s simplicity, it’s commonness, it’s possibilities and meaning.
sri threads :old cloth

I spend happy hours considering and choosing – today I’m gathering bits of indigo for an owl. I love the textures and patinas that comes from decades or centuries of life and use and I make things that celebrate it as I find it – all it’s scars and mending apparent. And I add my own patches and mends and visible stitching – I love the sewness, the make believe. The fragility and other unexpected qualities of very old cloth send me in new directions, new ways of doing things. I used some of my most treasured scraps from Sri Threads to make these toadstools.

sri toadstools

indgo sri toadstool

I love the little guy. You can find all three in the shop today.

As I was working on them I was thinking about constructing shapes in cloth and what a fascinating process that is. If you’re experimenting with that kind of sewing, especially if you’re just beginning to play with three dimensional sewing – spheres are a great place to start. When I teach a workshop I almost always give away a pattern for three and four part spheres. You can download that pattern here if you like.

And speaking of patterns – more are coming soon – fabric boats, tiny dolls and the flamingo kit. I’ve hit a lot of snags and complications putting that together, it’s been a bigger mountain to climb than I expected but it’s almost there.

And in other news:

A new podcast interview! My second ever. Find my conversation with my good friend Elizabeth Duvivier (founder and director of Squam Art Retreats) here. I loved our chat – Elizabeth is a smart cookie, a truly curious person and I love her new podacast. Two of my favorite episodes are with Suzan Mischer and Kerry Lemon. I hope you check it out.