Category: botanical

a caption contest – win your very own fortuny seed pod

fortuny rat

fortuny rat

Update 8/4 : Thanks so much for all the great captions for last weeks contest! The winner is:

“Left, right, cha, cha, cha! One, two, cha, cha, cha!”

I love the idea of  him practicing his dance steps with the mirror – nice work Lourdes!

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I’m working on mostly top secret things right now – holiday stuff,  2 brand new workshops for next year and the tedious parts – formatting, editing etc. – of creating the rag doll and seed pod patterns.  Since I can’t show you what’s on my work table it’s the perfect time for a caption contest.

I try to make creatures whose expression and body language imply a history – a definite point of view,  a world of their own.  And I like to photograph them in a way that invites you to wonder what’s going on outside the frame.  This is one of my most favorite photos – taken last year in the Adirondacks.  What do you think this dapper rat is up to? What’s on his rat mind?

Make up a caption and leave it in the comments to this post – an esteemed panel of judges will choose a winner to be announced next Thursday.  Everybody is welcome to enter – please leave your caption comment before Wednesday 8/3.

And the prize – a Fortuny seed pod! Such a tragic flower – gone to seed – collapsed in a pretty heap.

fortuny seed pod

fortuny seed pod

a cloaked bishop lilly and other stitched botanicals

stitched botanicals

stitched botanicals

I’ve been experimenting with new botanical shapes.  The flower below is the rare cloaked Bishop Lilly – it only blooms at night.  If the moon is full.  Once every ten years. And only for an hour…..

There are also seedpods,  toadstools and another rare specimen the Royal Cone Flower – valued for the rich crimson bloom as well as it’s medicinal properties – it’s petals make a potent sleeping potion – it is found only in the Black Forest and is nearly extinct.

I love the mystery and strangeness of flowers and I’m exploring them further – playing with the idea of translucency and things gone to seed.  I especially love the foresty parts of the botanical gardens here in Brooklyn and I’ve been finding inspiration in antique botanical prints too – for my invented species as well as the photographs of them – I’m thinking of a postcard set of strange new specimens – what do you think? Also – In addition to the tiny rag doll pattern I’m working on a botanical pattern  for a seed pod with a root system – that will probably be next out. Have a lovely weekend,

ann

cloaked bishop lilly

cloaked bishop lilly

toadstool #10

You can find the sewing pattern for the little toadstool above right here – I printed the pattern at 50% for this little guy.

aubergine_toadstool

royal cone flower

cloaked bishop lilly

plum seedpod

lavender_seedpod_2

miss lilac

And among all the strange flowers – tiny rag doll #4 – miss lilac.

botanical experiments

royal cone flower

This big pink flower woke me up last night. It’s one of the new botanical experiments I’ve been working on and it was finished but I didn’t love it- something wasn’t right. The original stem and roots felt too delicate, too fussy for the flower and out of balance – that idea would not leave me alone. My subconscious must have been working on it for me and  last night I woke up abruptly knowing exactly what it needed – a bulb, a more substantial stem and very simple leaves.   I love the bulb!  More botanical experiments soon – there are all sorts of strange new species on my work table.

Have a lovely weekend,

ann

stitched botanical


stitched botanical

stitched seedpod

stitched seedpod

pixie toadstools and mr. cups

mr. cups

mr. cups

Meet Mr. Cups! My new helper – I found him upstate last weekend in a fabulously junky junk shop – he makes a very cheery pin holder. I love the way his details are painted – I looked him up and found out he was made in Japan in the forties and there is a Mrs. – I’m on the look out.  He helped me make lots of mini toadstools – pixie size fungi made from Japaanese garment fragments (from lovely Sri Threads). They are made with the little mushroom sewing pattern – it scales up and down well – I printed the templates at 50% for these little guys.

textile toadstools

the little mushroom sewing pattern

two blue toadstools

toadstool detail

They were fun to make in a batch and easy to travel with – just a little bag of scraps and a few supplies – a good summer project. I also added a little extra height to the top for a couple – tracing the template and adding about another 1/2 inch to the top for a pointier cap.

textile toadstools

toadstools moss

indigo owl toadstool

All nine pixie mushrooms will be in the shop next Tuesday 6/7  (1 pm-ish NY time) along with some other new things I’m working on including the large indigo toadstool and the dastardly fellow lurking in the background above.

* You can sign up here if you’d like an email when new things are in the shop.

songbird work, a spider and a seedpod

songbird work

songbird work

songbird beaks and legs

I’m working on a little group of songbirds – some made from Japanese garment fragments and 2 from Edwardian garments.  Their beaks are carved from twigs collected over the summer and their legs are paper mache over wire.  Hoping to have all 6 finished and photographed for next week.  The commitment to add new things to the shop every Thursday has been a good push so far – a good sort of pressure.

And a couple newly finished things  – both are in the shop now along with rag doll #1 – a hand stitched botanical experiment and a bustled spider.

botanical experiment : seedpod

botanical experiment : seedpod

botanical experiment : seedpod

bustled spider

bustled spider

Don’t go away mad little spider – just go away.

october is for paper mache and terrariums

paper mache teacups

What’s better than an October day, so sunny and crisp and warm that a layer of paper mache dries in 20 minutes in the sun? I’m making some teacups for gifts and my tree this year – I usually use two layers of paper over the cardboard and this is the first.  These will be extra special because they are infused with spectaular Octoberness.

paper mache teacups

october

The color of the sky doesn’t seem real – but it was – what a day. October also means saying goodbye to the forest and that fantastic earth smell so I brought some home with me.

moss and lichen

happy terrariumMy terrarium perrished towards the end of last winter – the boiler in the old Brooklyn building I live in went south and there was a week of swinging between no heat and oven like temperatures that my little globe of mosses did not survive.  I love having a little bit of the forest with me through the winter, it’s happy in there and it smells good.

P. S.  The star pattern is almost here but not quite – I can’t get through a pattern step shoot without a big do-over.  Maybe it’s because of rushing or becoming increasingly persnicity about images or maybe I just need to do everything twice.

stars

 

19th century surprise in a phoebe nest, fungi and a newt

newt

I sew in a little house in the Adirondacks as much as possible in the warmer months.  And every year (so far) Eastern Phoebes build a nest under the roof overhang and have little Phoebes – sometimes two broods in a season.  I love watching them. This year I got a chance to examine a nest up close for the first time.  It is a beautiful, delicate, thoughtfully made thing – one little bit at a time (Phoebe’s are pretty small).

phoebe nest

I don’t notice the thread or wool stuffing that floats away while I’m working but apparently they do and there it was, woven into the nest- the soft wooly stuff right on top for warm comfortable babies.  And below that there was another nest ( each brood gets a fresh nest)  with a bit of tulle  from a 19th century gown and Japanese indigo threads. I’m so pleased they found it useful!

phoebe nest

adirondack forest

I also wanted to share  a couple photos from a walk I took in a part of the forest I hadn’t explored before, a long walk off the path and through the wild stuff. The smells were incredible and I saw things I had not encountered before –  like this strange pinkish thing – I discovered later it’s coral fungi.

coral fungi

newt

And I ran into a newt – a lovely little red eft who graciously let me take his picture.

toadstool pattern progress

little mushroom sewing pattern

The toadstool pattern is just about done.  I’ve got a few steps to reshoot and then a little more work on the document and it’s ready to go. I’ve taught this class a couple of  times and that definitely helped in writing the steps.

toadstool pattern work

It took two years of experimenting to get the shape I wanted in my toadstools. Two years of almost there but not quite.  I am pathologically persistent – relentless. The most difficult part was finding a reasonably efficient way of making the concave shape for the underside, reasonably efficient and reproducible. I tried so many things – some with interesting results – like foam padded bra inserts – but it wasn’t exactly what I wanted.  What I ultimately came up with is simple and has a lot of flexibility – the shape and effect can be varied with little adjustments – it’s fun to play with.

squam toadstool workshop(photo by Andi Schrader)

I loved teaching the class – the steps seem odd until all of a sudden a toadstool appears. I hope one of the takeaways from my botanical experiment classes and this pattern is thinking innovatively about shape building and materials.

So stay tuned and if you would like to be notified by email when new patterns are released you can sign up here.

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botanical inspiration

I’m in a year of experimenting and shifting and being a beginner. One of my main life skills is being a good beginner – moving  forward without a lot of attachment to outcome – being willing to act in uncertainty. From the perspective of feeling confident and comfortable The Squam Retreat is a terrible idea for me. The days are intense and challenge me in so many ways: I’m used to, and enjoy, being by myself. The idea of sharing a cabin with strangers for 4 days seems impossible. Teaching – speaking to a group – managing precious time for other people, all seem like giant mountains to climb. It was all so worth it – and then some. I had wonderful cabin mates and that was a big part of the experience – left to my own devices I would have missed that. Elizabeth Duvivier plans every detail of this experience thoughtfully, insightfully and expertly. I loved teaching- again. It got my wheels turning in new ways.  I loved getting glimpses of other peoples imaginations and processes. I think there is a moment in learning a new skill or technique when doors open in your imagination – possibilities emerge and you experience an elusive kind of flow and focus.  It’s inspiring and motivating to watch that unfold.

I came home exhausted and charged up at the same time. Four days out of my routine was valuable in so many ways.  I did things I was afraid of, learned more about my own rhythms, got a million new ideas and made friends. Real Friends. The experience left me with a New Year’s day kind of feeling – a map of things I need to pay more attention to, ways in which I should be challenging myself more often, ways I need to grow and ideas that I have been consistently resistant to that I don’t just need to consider but should be marching towards.  I did as much learning as I did teaching – from students and the class experience and from spending time with women who run creative businesses and run them beautifully.

little house

It was my second time at Squam  and the second time I was so engaged in the moment and the experience I forgot to record it. I’m so grateful to Andi Schrader for taking the wonderful photos below.  She also made this little house  – I love it and it is a perfect token of the experience.

Some glimpses of the botanical class through Andi’s lense:

botanical inspiration

andi's toadstools

suzan's mushroom

squam_toadstools

(more photos after the break)

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headed for squam

botanical experiment

I’m headed to the Squam Art Retreat tomorrow to teach my botanical sewing class – I can’t wait to get started. I’m bringing a ridiculous amount of stuff with me – it’s like I’m moving. I’ll also be at the art fair with some of my botanical experiments and I’ll have the prototypes for the ship pattern with me too  if you’d like to see or have a question, or just come say hi – the fair is always fabulous.

botanical experiment

And some new Fortuny pieces – I just sent this group off to Venice.

rats

Francesco and Alessandro

piero

Piero

lorenzo

And Lorenzo.

mushroom hunting

I’ve been taking some time to wander around and pay extra attention to moss and mushrooms and other botanicals in preparation for my class at Squam this year (just a couple weeks away!).  On my last excursion I spotted all sorts of mushrooms – most of which I’ve never seen before.

red mushroom

yellow mushroom

This yellow one with a spotted cap was the biggest- the size of my hand and intensely yellow.

black_mushrooms

These little yellow and black ( and kind of creepy)  guys are tiny – less than an inch high.

mushroom

 

mini_terrerium

I also made a little terrarium with a tiny fishbowl I found at a yard sale.

I’m looking forward to the class and the time in the forest and it also winds up a period of extreme busyness for me – I’m working on the botanical class, 2 new patterns, a special project for holiday 2015 and another for holiday 2014 among other things – all wrapping up in the next couple weeks. The last night of the Squam retreat (9/13) there’s an Art Fair – if New Hampshire is not too far for you I hope you’ll come say hi.