All posts by annwood

the positive snowball effect of finishing things and a new workshop

ann wood

It’s such a mistake to let too many unfinished projects pile up. The weight of all that isn’t done can really mess with a person’s momentum and momentum is key.  When it happens the only way through is to start finishing things – one at a time. This week I’ve been finishing stuff – big stuff and little stuff. A wooly edwardian owl was the first – he was nearly there so it was an easy win.

hand stitched owl

He’ll be in the shop next week with some songbirds and other creatures – you can sign up here if you would like an email notification when the new things are available.

Crossing just one thing off the list makes a huge difference, the shift is instant and it’s easier to tackle the next – as each task is completed momentum starts to snowball and replace the self perpetuating overwhelmed and stuck feelings.  My next project was finishing up my improvisational doll experiments – also lingering in “all most done”.

handmade dolls

handmade soldier doll

He stepped right out of a Jane Austen novel, one of her steady hearted colonels. I love him. And he is excellent at guarding books.

A large project got finished too,  creating a new workshop for this September.  Come see me in Boulder!

ann wood

That’s me – in my middle aged art lady uniform. The linen smock (by Cal Patch) really is my uniform – if you run in to me in Brooklyn or come to Colorado there’s a pretty solid chance I’ll have it on. This is my first 3 day workshop ever and it’s presented by the Makerie  September 22nd through the 24th.  3 days to explore something with a small group sounds marvelous. The title of the work shop is Natural History.

little fly

I can share all the details with you next week and registration will open then too. For now I’ll leave you with this very little fly I made to bring to Boulder with me.

improvisational doll making – part 2

soldier doll

(you can find part 1 here)

The more time I give myself for play like this the better my thinking, my connection making and idea generating get. While messing around with these dolls I have had one million ideas. This kind of experimenting is like giving my imagination vitamins. It is not an efficient way to make a doll, and I get frustrated in the process sometimes (it takes a while to shift out of expectations and perfectionist thinking and into curiosity) but it never fails to get me to new places. In trying stuff – stuff that works and stuff that doesn’t – I make connections I would not have otherwise made and connections are where ideas come from.

improvisational doll making

I experimented with a bunch of stuff for making arms and legs and landed on something simple I like. I’ve made her arms and legs in two sections upper and lower from the paper covered wire. Each section gets covered with batting and then covered with fabric.

I left a little extra at the ends so they would be easy to join and nice and bendy. The legs are made the same way and I added a little lace to the top before attaching by whip stitching to the bottom of her torso with sturdy thread.

improvisational doll making

I like her spidery arms and legs.  I’ll leave her for now and show you progress on the other girl who is no longer a girl.  Read More

improvisational doll making – part 1

improvisational doll making

Its good to experiment – but not easy to let yourself,  there is a powerful force that wants you to stay on the well lit path.  Experimenting generates ideas and makes you ask new questions. It can shift your perspective, reveal connections and intersections.  And maybe most importantly true experimentation helps you work with uncertainty and build a tolerance for trying stuff that might not work. There is no creativity without failure.

One way to make yourself experiment is to create conditions that force you to improvise. I’m going to show you one of the techniques I use.  I’m making dolls – from the inside out. It’s a method that is imprecise and difficult to control – in a good way – there is lots of opportunity for happy accidents. It’s a spontaneous process – each action builds on the previous – you work with what shows up.

If you would like to try you will need:

* you can click on any of the images for a larger view

wire doll forms

I start by making a simple wire form for the torso and head – I made three.  Next  cut strips of cotton batting and begin to build a shape by winding it around the wire form.  A little bit of glue stick will help when adding or ending a strip.

Keep winding until you are happy with the shape – you can also add bits of batting in some areas for rounder shapes – like in the center image above – I’ve given her a substantial bosom by adding a scrap of folded batting and winding over it. I stitch through the shape here and there to adjust it and help it all stay together and finally I cut pieces of batting to stitch over the shape.

Next I begin to add fabric – I’m using a very light cotton to cover her face and the front of her chest. I pull the fabric around – stitch it in place and trim away the extra.

I covered the edge of the face fabric with strips of cotton for hair – I’ll come back to that later – I want to make the top of her dress first.  Also – you may notice another doll has appeared – I’ll be working on her as well.

Her face and chest  are covered in a light ivory silk, I used black cotton for her hair and stitched super simple features. Now I’m adding a scrap of lace because it’s lovely and will also cover some edges and seams I’d like to conceal.  Read More

botanicals, bats and my new favorite supply – buckram

bats and botanicals

Have you ever tried Buckram? It’s a millinery supply. I’m continuing to experiment with bats and for this patched plum bat I’m trying buckram as a substrate – something to give it sculptural form. You can find buckram on Etsy – and it comes in all sorts of variations – black, white, heavy, light, fusible, sheets, rolls etc. etc.  I got a big roll of the heavy weight – non fusible  – in white. I’m also a big fan of millinery wire – there’s some of that in this bat too.

buckram

You can get buckram wet and form it or cut darts and stitch though it – I stitched it both by hand and on the machine.  I like the stability of the shapes I made (you can layer it for even more stability)  and how easy it is to stitch through.  I did need to cover the edges – they are a little sharp and my fabrics were particularly delicate.  I’ve been intending to try it for ages – it’s good stuff!  And has given me all sorts of ideas. I’m going to add it to the resource list. If you’re curious about it search on google and pinterest – for buckram and hat making – interesting stuff pops up. There is a lot to be learned about shape building from milliners.

I’ve  also been working on botanical experiments, revisiting two exotic species I created last year – The Royal Cone Flower and a Cloaked Bishop Lilly.  There are colors and color combinations I come back to again and again – deep smokey plums and violets, indigo, and greens with a little acidity to them and little bits of crimson.  The plums, violets and indigos are almost always Japanese (courtesy of Sri Threads). The crimson touches on the bat and Bishops Lilly are both very old – 18th and early 19th century.  I dye most of my greens and it’s always too dull for me so they get a quick second dip in sunflower yellow.  My favorite dyes are Dylon and idye (idye is intended for the machine – but since I dye tiny things in delicate ways I cut the little dissolvable packets open – it’s messy but works and their colors are great.

stitched botanical experiments

royal cone flower

And toadstools – little guys – mini versions made from the mushroom pattern printed at about 70%  (it scales up and down well). I love the mini- ness – just big enough for the palm of your hand or pocket. everybody needs a lucky mushroom in their pocket – especially in the spring.

mini toadstools

 

 

dastardly creatures, what makes a good sewing pattern (and a peek at the next)

There are dastardly and debonair creatures on my worktable.  I think these three will be the last for a while – there’s new stuff I’d like to try with them and some unnecessarily cumbersome parts in the process to work on.   They will remain Rubenesque, ill-tempered and condescending though.

gray woolen owl

The 2 Fortuny owls below  will be going to the New York showroom and the grey edwardian wooly fellow above will be in the shop soon.

I’m also working on new patterns and it is time for a creative sprint in that department.  All the way to the finish line.  I think this is the longest stretch since I began publishing patterns that there has not been a new one.  I got spectacularly stuck – largely because there are too many in progress – I overwhelmed myself, spread my energy and focus too thin.  So I’ve chosen one to focus on,  to apply a great deal of energy to over the next week (more on that in a minute).

fortuny ship and bat

But first I’d like to answer my most frequently asked (lately) question:  Will there be a bat sewing pattern? I can answer with a solid maybe.  I’d like there to be but as of yet  I don’t have them figured out enough to know if they would be a good one. And for me that means:

  • something that I can create a linear process with reliable results for
  • that this can be done in a workable amount of space – print – pdf wise
  • that it can be made with simple materials (ideally repurposed things), in a reasonable – ish amount of time
  • and that it demonstrates a useful and/ or unique technique that could generate other ideas

That’s pretty much my criteria – I wonder what you might think – what you prefer?

stitched rutabaga

stitched rutabaga detail

Something that I think would make a good sewing pattern is rutabagas (and turnips) – that will be the next published pattern. I got a lot of insight into the process last weekend at the Sweet Paul Makerie – I taught it twice as a workshop.  Seeing 25 individual interpretations of the majestic turnip was incredibly helpful.

(checkout the makerie instagram for more photos of the weekend – as usual I was having such a good time I forgot to take pictures)

sweet paul makerie rutabaga

sweet paul makerie turnips

And – I’ve already worked out most of the detail, templates etc. in preparing to teach.

Look for the pattern in the next week or two and I’ll leave you with this little chocolate bunny (forest folk pattern) – have a lovely Easter weekend.

fortuny bunny

 

 

outfitting mrs. spots and small art series 2

rag doll : mrs. spots

rag doll : mrs. spots

Meet Mrs. Spots – a dear old friend of Mr. Socks. There have been a number of questions lately – and – I have wondered myself – if the tiny rag doll’s wardrobe could work for the Mr. Socks doll pattern.  I spent some time experimenting with that and – with some adjustments – it can.  And that is how I arrived at Mrs. Spots.

rag doll : mrs. spots

Beginning with the dress – it needs to be a little larger,  Mrs. Spots is taller than the tiny rag doll and has considerable girth around the middle. There are two easy ways to do it – you can add a quarter inch to the dress pattern   – the cut line becomes the stitch line with the exception of the back center seam – don’t add extra there.

Or just enlarge the pattern to 115%  ( I have not tried this with the pinafore apron yet but I suspect enlarging it to 115% would work – if you give it a try I’d love to see).

rag doll : mrs. spots

rag doll : mrs. spots

For the coat – so easy – you can use the pattern at it’s original size but skip the hood and do not sew the back seam (step 3 in the pattern)  – leave the full width.  The little satchel works as is too.

rag doll : mrs. spots

And finally the free hat pattern – for days when a coat is just too much.  I enlarged it to fit  and you can download the larger size here.

And some small art news:

I’ll be adding the first of the small art series 2 pieces to the shop soon – either tomorrow or over the weekend (sorry that’s not more specific  – I have a couple tech things to work out). I’m planning on adding about 24 little paintings.  If you are on the artwork list you will get an email notification (not sure if you are? email me – happy to help)  and I’ll also update this post and instagram.

bats and perseverance

bat work

bat work

I have been bothered by bats for a very long time.  They were one of my first stitched creatures. I love them but vowed to never make another.  The process was brutal on my hands and had a high late stage failure rate.  And they took an outrageous amount of time.  But I love them, I love their shape, their curves and the way that shape seems to change as they twirl in the breeze and the lovely shadows they cast.

stitched bat

So lately I started from scratch – a whole new method of constructing them.  There have been several dismal failures but in the past week I’ve landed on something good -. It’s much easier hand-wise and the result is reliable and consistent.  It still takes forever. Not as bad as the original bats but still problematic.  I’m not sure I can get to a place where I can produce them with any efficiency but I’m not done trying.

stitched bat

edwardian bat

botanical experiments and 11 years of blogging

stitched seedpod experiment

white rotary

A blog anniversary snuck past in February – 11 years.  When I did remember I thought maybe I didn’t really have anything to say about it.  But the comments about the machine on last week’s post changed my mind.  I remembered what a part of everything the machine has been.  I remembered the serendipity,  the sweetness and steadiness of it’s presence in my life and work.

It has been with me for all of it.  My mother’s machine.  I have sewn on it my entire life.  So I want to mark this anniversary with an entirely true and slightly spooky story about it.  It happened in the very beginning of this blog – 11 years ago:

In December of 2006 I had just begun my solo enterprise – I had lots of orders and deadlines and on the eve of one of those very important deadlines I was still sewing furiously very late at night. With a long way still to go the machine suddenly stopped and a chunk of metal rocketed past my face. I found it across the room – an essential part of the machine – no sewing without it – and it was broken. I tried to fix it but nothing worked. I have a drawer full of bits and pieces that I saved from my Father’s workshop – bits of metal and rubber, knobs, washers, gears, springs etc. I thought maybe I could cobble some temporary solution together from those. Another hour of frustration and no luck at all. Exhausted, defeated and ready to give up I pushed the drawer closed and it stuck halfway, I pushed again and it stuck again, I pulled and it stuck. I gave a great big angry pull and the drawer flew out and what had caused it to stick also flew out and landed  – right   in    my    lap.  To my amazement and disbelief it was a replacement for the broken sewing machine part – the exact part – identical but for the color. Not similar, not “good enough” the EXACT PART in perfect condition. I snapped it in and it worked beautifully, that night and all the nights and days that have followed.

The End.

botanical experiment

And – a little bit of what I’m working on today. New botanical experiments.  I think the one above will be a pink cloaked bishop lily and below a seedpod experiment – playing with the idea of honeycomb texture. I’ve got plans for more and I’ll show you next week.  I’m also planning on a shop update next week  (postponed for a bit) with botanicals and some creatures. You can sign up here to be notified by email when new items are available.

stitched seedpod experiment

an aristocratic lamb : how to create texture with fabric

lamb rag doll

lamb rag doll hooves

An aristocrat, from the tips of his well manicured hooves to the perfectly coiffed curls of his head. I can see his whole world – the crumbling manor house,  stern ancestors glowering down from the walls,  the dim and dusty library,  his ever-present walking stick and far away gaze. The once stately gardens are a little more overgrown every year but he either does not notice or does not care.  All is well, he has his books, his tea, his evening walks and his memories of his youth and the sea.

lamb rag doll

lamb rag doll

I will probably not make another like him – his luxurious texture has been tormenting me – it took ages.   I’m never doing it again.  I might do it one more time.  I like the technique and use it often for small things but there was a lot of lamb to cover here. If you would like to similarly torment yourself  I took some progress shots along the way.

ruffle fabric

I start with long strips of light fabric – a cotton voile in this case – and about 1 and 1/4 inches wide. My old White Rotary has an awesome ruffle attachment or you can achieve the same effect (on light fabric) by turning your stitch size to the largest and the tension to the highest setting. I stitched just off center.

lamb ruffles

Fold the ruffled strip over at the seam, press and start stitching it on – whip stitching over the seam. Row after row, around and around.  In the photo below you can see how much space there is between rows. This varies depending on the size of the project and the ruffle – for my fancy lamb it is between 1/4 and 1/2 inch – I get a little closer in curvy places.

lamb ruffles

lamb ruffles

And at last the fun part.  When he was all covered I gave him a serious haircut.  Holding the scissors parallel to the ruffled surface start snipping.  You can do a little or a lot – I did a lot.

lamb rag doll

The ruffle situation on this guy happened by accident – I was working on a lamb rag doll pattern and  couldn’t help myself.  There will be a sewing pattern for him soon – sans ruffles.

 

please meet vivienne and work on a new rag doll experiment

Entirely nude, but for a threadbare whisper of a nightgown.

vivienne : naked ragdoll

The gown is made from the sleeve of an Edwardian lawn gown – so simple to make. I just hemmed the top edge – gathered across the front side and added ribbon ties that go around her neck – halter style.

vivienne : an immodest doll

She is offered in the shop – along with a few other new things – as promised I’ve been adding at least one new thing every day and will continue to for as long as seems reasonable.  For now she is happy here,  she sits serenely,  in her nightgown,  silently judging that little ant who admires himself so constantly.

ant and ragdoll

ant and ragdoll

And something new on my worktable – an evolving rag doll creature. The texture thing is pretty ambitious and I’m not sure I’ll ever do it again,  it’s labor intensive even by my standards.  But I do like the effect on him.

ragdoll experiment

lovely feature in Maries Ideer magazine

an wood

Welcome,  good people of Denmark!  I had an intriguing conversation with writer Katrine Sivkær Pettersen around Christmas last year  and the resulting article appears in the March / April edition of Maries Ideer Magazine. We talked a lot about creativity, imagination and papermache – 3 of my favorite subjects and there are lots of photos.

annwood : maries ideer magazine

A side benefit of photographing my place for an article is that I have to spiff it up pretty thoroughly  – nothing like a credible threat for motivation – and the resulting tidyness has  pretty much stuck.  There are a few photos from the December shoot below.

ann wood : studio

ann wood : studio

an wood

ann wood : studio

The photo above looks like I have ghosts floating around doesn’t it? I would not be surprised – or it might be a smudged  lens filter….. Probably ghosts.

annwood : maries ideer magazine

And there is a tutorial! For a little paper mache boat – just big enough for a tiny rag doll.  It’s all in Danish but each step is illustrated with a photo so I think you could accomplish it without understanding the text.  I’m not sure where it might be available in the US  – but I will inquire and update here.

recreational patchwork and 18th century songbirds

fortuny patchwork

After working on something small, detailed and intense I like to give my focus and brain a vacation. One of my favorite ways to do that is something I call recreational patchwork. I started a Fortuny patchwork piece today. I have lots of very small swatches and some longish strips – drapery scraps. It is good daydreamy work. It requires just the right amount of my attention for letting ideas percolate. It’s a peaceful, gentle state.

fortuny patchwork

I work quickly – making strips and then sewing them together – log-cabin-ish I guess. Nothing is planned – I just grab pieces randomly. Nothing is measured, corners aren’t square and seams are less than straight. I bounce between the machine and the ironing board. I love the energy of it, I love the result and it’s such fun to do – to not think or plan and see what turns up – embrace the happenstance, appreciate the happy accidents.

18th century birds

It was a welcome shift after working on a trio of 18th century songbirds for one million years. Songbirds are very slow, very focused, detailed, difficult and fussy work. Lots of ripping out and doing again. Lots of stabbing myself with very tiny, very sharp needles. I want something particular from each of them and I can’t stop until I get it. The prize at the end is I get to photograph them – and that is such fun.

ann wood : songbirds

These three birds will be in the shop tomorrow (March 3rd) – you’ll get an email notification if you are on the artwork email list (if you’re not sure if you are just email me – happy to help).

And speaking of the shop – starting on Saturday – 3/4 – I’ll be adding at least one new thing to the shop everyday. There will be ships and boats, mischievous cats, owls, goats, rag dolls (some will be quite nude) maybe paintings – experiments – all sorts of things. The time will vary – and I’ll do it for at least a week – longer if it works out well.

P.S. Checkout some incredible raw edge Fortuny patchwork from Valentino here.

painting and drawing everyday

daily art : goat

There are things that make my life and brain work better.  Sketchbook – painting and drawing everyday, whether I want to or not, is one of them.  So my daily practice is back. And I have three hopes for it:

1.  That I can be consistent – that I build a solid enough habit that it doesn’t fall apart when I get extra busy.

2. That it leads me into larger work – my original intention was to turn the experiments I like into larger pieces – paintings, illustrations – maybe even fabric, I’ve yet to do that. I find the idea terribly intimidating.

3.  And to increase my success rate.  Last time I made 511 little squares.  When I started I had no plans to sell them but I felt good enough about some of them to offer them in the shop.  Only about 10% made the cut.  As I begin the practice again I’m doing it with the awareness that I intend to sell some of them and it does change my feelings about making them.  I think I’m much less likely to phone it in when I’m feeling lazy or distracted.  It’s a little extra pressure I think I need.  Series 2 paintings will begin to be available sometime this month. You can sign up here if you’d like an email notification.

daily art : annwood

After some initial misery and resistance and a lovely mix of self flagellation, anxiety and doubt   I’m finding some rhythm and building a routine again.  I did a few things to remove obstacles – make it easy for myself to show up.  I spend some time Sunday cutting up the squares (hot press water color paper) so they are ready to go.  And I make marks on some of them – splatter ink, scribble something or paint a background color – in case the blank paper is too much.  So helpful.  My paints and other supplies are organized and easy to get to.  And ideally  I like to start after 10 minutes of deliberate day dreaming – it usually puts me in the right brain place – a receptive place.  So does my sound app – still Wind through Pines – it’s magic for me.

daily art : goat

You can find my first week back at it here and I’ll post each week on Saturday. So far goats and  pigeons are very much on my mind…….

visible mending and a victorian bird

mending

In 1978, Soviet geologists discovered a family of six, in the vast and wild Siberian forest. They had been living there, in a cobbled together shack by a stream in complete isolations for 40 years. They missed World War 2.  Geologist Galina Pismenskaya recalled her first encounter with the family:

“The low door creaked, and the figure of a very old man emerged into the light of day, straight out of a fairy tale. Barefoot. Wearing a patched and re-patched shirt made of sacking. He wore trousers of the same material, also in patches”

I wanted to share the story with you because the details of their life and survival are astounding – you can find the article here.  And the image of the old man’s clothing grabbed me – I guess you could call it extreme mending.  Mending is fascinating and I think so often beautiful.

My policy on possessions is have good things you love, not too many, and keep them for a long time. I almost never buy clothes. There are a just a couple exceptions – every once in a while I buy a smock dress from Cal Patch and wear it relentlessly.  First there was this one and then last summer this one.  It’s my uniform – I like having a uniform.  Most of what I have was given to me and much of it I’ve had for a long time. I mend things, make do, re-use and repurpose. I like the practicality – economy and the aesthetics.

The blue jacket was given to me 15 years ago I think – I wore the sleeve edges ragged and I’m patching them with lovely old cloth from Sri Threads.

mending

The green jacket above I’ve had for about 20 years – it has lot’s of issues but not enough to let it go – I’m patching it with gorgeous Fortuny scraps.  I’m partial to flannel shirts and the red plaid above is a favorite – besides the ragged sleeves (I’m hard on sleeves) It had a big hole under one arm. Nothing says success like an underarm hole.  I patched it with a 19th century dress maker’s scrap.

dress mend

And the dress above – also a hand me down – is one of my most adventurous mends. The bottom of the skirt had a big section with glue or something spilled on it. I cut it out and sewed in a section from a cotton camisole. There was a little button loop and I left it at the bottom and added a button to the seam so I could pull the hem up. Pretty fancy.

me and moose

And Moose – there has to be a photo of Moose and she sort of agreed to participate. She visited here all week – such a good kitten.

In other sewing news – I finished the victorian bird! 9 years after starting – but still – so good to get it done.

victorian bird

victorian bird

victorian bird

 

ships and boats and goats on my work table

little wool goat

little woolen goat

All of a sudden I felt a strong spiritual need to make a goat.  I thought that I would just print the pattern sheets and get started but I haven’t made a goat or a lamb in such a long time that I had to follow my directions closely. It was a strange sensation – relying on the steps that I wrote and photographed but couldn’t remember.  I’m relieved to report that I found myself to be an excellent instructor.  In the lamb and goat pattern I recommend quilting cotton ( find the sleepy goat  sewing pattern here)  but I wanted to make a goat from a fabulous grey wool Edwardian skirt I found last year. It’s a homespun feeling wool and a little fragile – very goatish but not so fun to sew.  It took longer and was fussier than cotton but I felt like it was worth the extra effort – and I like how sculptural I could be with the wool.  I love him.

little wool goat

little wool goat

I immediatley started another wool goat using a vintage blue pendelton shirt. It’s a lot sturdier than the grey and should be easier. I love the color and texture. I’ve been making tiny things from this shirt for a year or so – but it kills me a little each time – I don’t ever want to run out.

fabric ship building

And ships and boats – there is a fleet in progress.  I’m in a boat making mood (I think it’s March whispering to me from around the next bend).  And I’m preparing for a ship building workshop here in NYC in April.  We’ll be making fabric ships in the workshop and I’m testing and refining and rehearsing the steps. It still amazes me what graceful shapes cereal box cardboard can make – so many possibilities.

fabric boat building

I’m making some smaller sailboats for my fleet too  – they will have bird and owl captains (find the pattern to make your boats own here).  I’ll hang them all here and enjoy them for a little bit and then hopefully sell them so I can do it all again.